Undercurrents: beneath the obvious

February 2, 2007

VHS in the Great Lakes longer than originally thought

Back at this post, VHS was thought to be in Lake St. Clair, Lake Erie, the Niagara River, Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River. That thought may now be changing.

Fish disease may be in Lake Michigan already:

Just two and half months ago … experts said VHS had yet to work its way into Lake Huron. They predicted it might be two to four years away from Lake Michigan waters. At that time it was a problem in lakes Ontario, Erie and St. Clair, along with the St. Clair and Detroit rivers.

But now we find out that just isn’t so. At least not quite. Two to four years may be accurate, but the starting point has shifted.

DNR officials say the clock reset once old, frozen fish samples were rechecked. They did this last year.

“What we found is that VHS was present in Lake St. Clair in 2003 and in Lake Huron in 2005,” Kelly Smith, the DNR fisheries chief, said. “Go two to four years out and you are at 2007 for Lake Michigan.

“I’m guessing that it’s already there.”

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2 Comments »

  1. […] As of January 2007, waters known to be infected with the virus include Lake St. Clair, Lake Erie, the Niagara River, Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River. Or maybe more — see update here: VHS in the Great Lakes longer than originally thought […]

    Pingback by 5 Things to Know About Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia (VHS) « Surf-n-Sands II — February 5, 2007 @ 2:31 pm | Reply

  2. […] As of January 2007, waters known to be infected with the virus include Lake St. Clair, Lake Erie, the Niagara River, Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River. Or maybe more — see update here: VHS in the Great Lakes longer than originally thought […]

    Pingback by Another Dead Fish Story! | Pottstown's Blog — February 17, 2011 @ 9:47 am | Reply


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